Good practice involves: There are significant disparities in the health status of different groups in the Australian community. Code of Ethics for Pharmacists and Pharmacy Technicians. Our standards are outcome-focused and therefore do not set out in detail what pharmacy owners and pharmacy professionals need to do to make sure that patients and service users receive safe and effective care. Good practice involves: Treating patients or clients in emergencies requires practitioners to consider a range of issues, in addition to the provision of best care. Code of Conduct & Business Ethics | 1 LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT AND CEO I believe that Core values, both as individuals and as a company, guide how we do business and give Guardian Pharmacy a distinct advantage over others in the long-term pharmacy market. Care of the patient or client is the primary concern for health … Code of conduct We make sure our standards are relevant and up to date. This will generally be every three years. recognising potential conflicts of interest that may arise in relation to initiating or continuing a professional relationship with a patient or client, acting in the best interests of patients or clients when making referrals and when providing or arranging treatment or care, informing patients or clients when a practitioner has an interest that could affect or could be perceived to affect patient or client care, recognising that pharmaceutical and other marketing may influence practitioners and being aware of ways in which practice may be influenced, not asking for or accepting any inducement, gift or hospitality from companies that sell or market drugs or other products that may affect or be seen to affect the way practitioners prescribe for, treat or refer patients or clients, not asking for or accepting fees for meeting sales representatives, not offering inducements to colleagues or entering into arrangements that could be perceived to provide inducements, and. in relation to termination of business relationships and disputes over patients or clients. These standards of practice are generally found in documents issued by the relevant National Boards and/or professional bodies. The Code of Conduct is a public declaration of the principles and ethical standards which govern pharmacists in the practice of their profession, and which the public, patients, other healthcare professionals and society require and expect from pharmacists. understanding the particular role in the team and attending to the responsibilities associated with that role, advocating for a clear delineation of roles and responsibilities, including that there is a recognised team leader or coordinator although care within the team may be provided by different practitioners from different health professions within different models of care, communicating effectively with other team members, informing patients or clients about the roles of team members, acting as a positive role model for team members, understanding the nature and consequences of bullying and harassment and seeking to avoid or eliminate such behaviour in the workplace, and. The 14 National Boards regulating registered health practitioners in Australia are responsible for registering practitioners and students (except for in psychology, which has provisional psychologists), setting the standards that practitioners must meet, and managing complaints and concerns (notifications) about the health, conduct or performance of practitioners. communicating clearly, effectively, respectfully and promptly with colleagues and other practitioners caring for the patient or client, acknowledging and respecting the contribution of all practitioners involved in the care of the patient or client, and. Good practice in relation to risk management involves: The welfare of patients or clients may be put at risk if a practitioner is performing poorly. seeking to develop the skills, attitudes and practices of an effective teacher, whenever a practitioner is involved in teaching, as a supervisor, recognising that the onus of supervision cannot be transferred, making sure that any practitioner or student under supervision receives adequate oversight and feedback, including undertaking an assessment of each student supervised; reflecting on that student’s ability, competence and learning requirements; and planning their supervision based on that assessment rather than any external direction, and. Our standards are outcome-focused and therefore do not set out in detail what pharmacy owners and pharmacy professionals need to do to make sure that patients and service users receive safe and effective care. as a guide to the public and consumers of health services about what good practice is and the standard of behaviour they should expect from health practitioners. We conduct business according to the Golden Rule – fairly and honestly Code of Ethics for Pharmacists Preamble Pharmacists are health professionals who assist individuals in making the best use of medications. being aware of these reporting obligations, complying with any reporting obligations that apply to practice, and. They also have professional obligations to report to the Boards and their employer/s if they have had any limitations placed on their practice. safe and effective care from pharmacy professionals. Good care is enhanced when there is mutual respect and clear communication between all health professionals involved in the care of the patient or client. Practitioners should ensure that they are aware of their legal obligations and act in accordance with them. The new COP for ASP in both English and Chinese are available at the following links: Code of Practice for Authorized Seller of Poisons (2015) (with effect from 1 June 2015) understanding that the use of resources can affect the access other patients or clients have to healthcare resources. Care of the patient or client is the primary concern for health professionals in clinical practice. not exploiting the vulnerability or lack of knowledge of patients or clients when providing or recommending services, not encouraging patients or clients to give, lend or bequeath money or gifts that will benefit a practitioner directly or indirectly, not accepting gifts from patients or clients other than tokens of minimal value such as flowers or chocolates, and, if token gifts are accepted, making a file note or informing a colleague where possible, not becoming involved financially with patients or clients; for example, through loans and investment schemes, not influencing patients or clients or their families to make donations to other people or organisations, and. Good practice involves understanding and applying the key principles of risk minimisation and management in practice. We believe it is the attitudes and behaviours of pharmacy professionals in their day-to-day work which make the most significant contributions to the quality of care, of which safety is a vital part. Other organisations and … complying with relevant complaints legislation, policies and procedures. appropriate consent is obtained to the circumstances which is acknowledged by both the practitioner and patient or client, the personal relationship does not in any way impair clinical judgement, and, at all times an option to discontinue care is maintained. Minimising risk to patients or clients is a fundamental component of practice. The code contains important standards for practitioner behaviour in relation to: Making decisions about healthcare is the shared responsibility of the practitioner and the patients or clients (or their representative). Practitioners have a responsibility to recognise and work within the limits of their competence and scope of practice. ... A good doctor–patient partnership requires high standards of professional conduct. In October, 2008, the College’s Academic Standing Committee determined that Licensee’s conduct amounted to (ASC) ensuring that, when communicating with a child or young person, practitioners: treat the child or young person with respect and listen to their views, encourage questions and answer those questions to the best of the practitioner’s ability, provide information in a way the child or young person can understand, recognise the role of parents or guardians and, when appropriate, encourage the child or young person to involve their parents or guardians in decisions about care, and. Roles and Responsibilities of Pharmacists and Nurses (joint Pharmacy Council and Nursing Council statement) acknowledging the person’s right to complain, working with the person to resolve the issue where possible, providing a prompt, open and constructive response including an explanation and, if appropriate, an apology, ensuring the complaint or notification does not affect the person’s care adversely; in some cases, it may be advisable to refer the person to another practitioner, and. The Code sets the standard of professional conduct for all pharmacists and is regarded as governing the conduct of all pharmacists both within and outside the practice of pharmacy. The Code of Ethics Principles in both English and Te Reo Māori can be found here . Pharmacy Board (8,324) Physiotherapy Board (8,324) Podiatry Board (8,324) ... Good medical practice: a code of conduct for doctors in Australia. 6 Code of Conduct for Pharmacy Students This Code of Conduct is based on the same seven principles as those in the GPhC’s Standards of conduct, ethics and performance and this Code of Conduct explains how the principles apply to you as a student. The new COP for ASP in both English and Chinese are available at the following links: Code of Practice for Authorized Seller of … There are several conditions or situations in which patients or clients may have limited competence or capacity to make independent decisions about their healthcare; for example, people with dementia or acute conditions that temporarily affect competence and children or young people, depending on their age and capacity (see Section 3.5 Informed consent). 0000001269 00000 n Practitioners should refer to the National Board’s registration standard and guidelines on CPD for details of these requirements. Examination Division, National Health Personnel Licensing Examination Board; Telephone : 02-476-2333 0000010056 00000 n Act in the best interest of each … While good healthcare respects the rights of patients or clients, this code is not a charter of rights (an example of a charter is the Australian charter of healthcare rights issued by the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care. Code of Conduct for Pharmacists and Bodies Corporate (Pharmacy Board Malaysia), 2009 Pharmacy Code of Ethics (Singapore Pharmacy council), May 2009 Code of Ethics for Pharmacists and Pharmacy Technicians (Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain), 1 August 2007 Code of Ethics for Pharmacists (American Pharmacists Association), 2007 Good practice involves: Making decisions about healthcare is the shared responsibility of the treating practitioner and the patient or client who may wish to involve their family, carer/s and/or others. All advertisements must comply with the provisions of the National Law on the advertising of regulated health services, relevant consumer protection legislation, and state and territory fair trading Acts and, if applicable, legislation regulating the advertising of therapeutic goods. Evaluation, which lead back to 'Risk identification', being aware of the principles of open disclosure and a non-punitive approach to incident management; a useful reference is the, participating in systems of quality assurance and improvement, participating in systems for surveillance and monitoring of adverse events and ‘near misses’, including reporting such events to the relevant authority, if a practitioner has management responsibilities, making sure that systems are in place for raising concerns about risks to patients or clients, working in practice and within systems to reduce error and improve the safety of patients or clients and supporting colleagues who raise concerns about the safety of patients or clients, and. It involves practitioners understanding that each patient or client is unique and working in partnership with patients or clients, adapting what they do to address the needs and reasonable expectations of each person. Caring for children and young people brings additional responsibilities for practitioners. Website maintenance: Due to scheduled maintenance, online services will be unavailable between 9:00am and 1:00pm AEDT on Sunday 15 November 2020. (Also see Section 8.2, giving advance notice where possible and as early as possible, and. being courteous, respectful, compassionate and honest, treating each patient or client as an individual, protecting the privacy and right to confidentiality of patients or clients, unless release of information is required by law or by public interest considerations, encouraging and supporting patients or clients and, when relevant, their carer/s or family in caring for themselves and managing their health, encouraging and supporting patients or clients to be well-informed about their health and assisting patients or clients to make informed decisions about their healthcare activities and treatments by providing information and advice to the best of a practitioner’s ability and according to the stated needs of patients or clients, respecting the right of the patient or client to choose whether or not they participate in any treatment or accept advice, and, recognising that there is a power imbalance in the practitioner–patient/client relationship and not exploiting patients or clients physically, emotionally, sexually or financially (also see Section 8.2, listening to patients or clients, asking for and respecting their views about their health and responding to their concerns and preferences, awareness of health literacy issues and taking health literacy into account and/or adjusting their communication in response, encouraging patients or clients to tell a practitioner about their condition and how they are managing it, including any other health advice they have received, any prescription or other medications they have been prescribed and any other therapies they are using, informing patients or clients of the nature of and need for all aspects of their clinical care, including examination and investigations, and giving them adequate opportunity to question or refuse intervention and treatment, discussing with patients or clients their condition and the available healthcare options, including their nature, purpose, possible positive and adverse consequences, limitations and reasonable alternatives wherever they exist, endeavouring to confirm that a patient or client understands what a practitioner has said, ensuring that patients or clients are informed of the material risks associated with any part of a proposed management plan, responding to questions from patients or clients and keeping them informed about their clinical progress, making sure, whenever practical, that arrangements are made to meet the specific language, cultural and communication needs of patients or clients and being aware of how these needs affect understanding, becoming familiar with, and using whenever necessary, qualified language interpreters or cultural interpreters to help meet the communication needs of patients or clients, including those who require assistance because of their English skills, or because they are speech or hearing impaired (wherever possible, practitioners should use trained translators and interpreters rather than family members or other staff), taking reasonable steps to ensure that the interpreter is competent to work as an interpreter in the relevant context, taking reasonable steps to ensure that the interpreter is not in a relationship with the patient or client that may impair the interpreter’s judgement, taking reasonable steps to ensure that the interpreter will keep confidential the existence and content of the service provided to the patient or client, taking reasonable steps to ensure that the interpreter is aware of any other relevant provisions of this code, obtaining informed consent from the patient or client to use the selected interpreter, using social media, e-health and personally controlled electronic health records appropriately, consistent with this code, and. Patients or clients also rely on practitioners to protect their confidentiality. Practitioners have ethical and legal obligations to protect the privacy of people requiring and receiving care. supporting students and practitioners receiving supervision and others within the team. 3. Practitioners have a responsibility to contribute to the effectiveness and efficacy of the healthcare system. The code of conduct common to most National Boards was also reviewed and revised. Dispensing. PART 2: CODE OF CONDUCT. Continuing Education. Health Workforce Australia’s website provides information on a range of health workforce issues, including resources on clinical supervision. being considerate to relatives, carers, partners and others close to the patient or client and respectful of their role in the care of the patient or client, and. Code of Conduct for Pharmacists and Bodies Corporate 2009 Date: 23 October 2015 - 10:15am It is the responsibility of all registered pharmacists and bodies corpor ate to comply with all the requirements stipulated in this book. The Code of Conduct and Business Ethics (“the Code”) extends to all WBA officers and employees no matter where they are located in the world. Practitioners have statutory responsibility under the National Law to report matters to the National Boards: please refer to the Board’s guidelines on mandatory reporting and sections 130 and 141 of the National Law. when a patient or client dies, being willing to explain, to the best of the practitioner’s knowledge, the circumstances of the death to appropriate members of their family and carers, unless it is known the patient or client would have objected. Working in a team does not alter a practitioner’s personal accountability for professional conduct and the care provided. Practitioners must be honest and transparent in financial arrangements with patients or clients. All pharmacists registered with the Pharmacy Board of Australia (the ‘Board’) need to comply with a code of conduct which is common across most health professions and applies to all health practitioners registered through the National Registration and Accreditation Scheme (operated by the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency). The Code sets the standard of professional conduct for all pharmacists and is regarded as governing the conduct of all pharmacists both within and outside the practice of pharmacy. Good practice also includes being aware that differences such as gender, sexuality, age, belief systems and other anti-discrimination grounds in relevant legislation may influence care needs, and avoiding discrimination on the basis of these differences. When practitioners are involved in research that involves patients or clients, good practice includes: The Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care’s website provides relevant guidance on a range of safety and quality issues. Good practice involves offering assistance in an emergency that takes account of the practitioner’s own safety, skills, the availability of other options and the impact on any other patients or clients under the practitioner’s care, and continuing to provide that assistance until services are no longer required. This code seeks to assist and support practitioners to deliver appropriate, effective services within an ethical framework. Caring for children and young people brings additional responsibilities for practitioners. Make the care of patients your first concern. 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